And the world's future too.

Ankush is a journalist hailing from India, who has edited and written for publications in his home country, the UAE, US, and UK. Previously the editor of Gulf Business in Dubai and of Entrepreneur in India, Ankush is a keen student of economics, a follower of Manchester United since 1996 and a disciple of Archer.

Dubai’s ambitious Future accelerators Programme will close its doors to application tomorrow (Wednesday) and if you are one of those interested, you better stop reading this article and rush off to do the necessary.

For those living under a rock, Dubai Future Accelerators is an intensive 12-week program backed by the Dubai Future Foundation and the Government of Dubai that aims to match emerging technologies and businesses with real world problems—and letting them use Dubai and its many entities as a prototyping lab.

The Dubai government has been adamant in its resolve to point out that this is not a traditional accelerator or an incubator—its a program to accelerate the testing and deployment of transformative ideas, products and solutions  at a large scale.

The program is open to all companies, individuals and teams of any stage and size, anywhere in the world, which have a working prototype or solution that can be tested in a real-world application—for which the Dubai government is offering its many government departments including Dubai Municipality and Dubai Police.

To apply, one would have to approach any of the seven challenges (offered up by seven different Dubai departments) and offer up a proposal that includes a description of the product or technology, along with a short video demonstrating how it works and how it would address the selected challenge.

If selected, teams will be flown down to Dubai, where they will have access to a prototyping lab, our support staff, and dozens of experts, mentors, and community advisors as well as participate in a range of related  talks, lectures, and workshops.

Those selected will also have support in developing and structuring relationships with government entities and private sector partners, the government has said.

Crucially, Dubai’s government has made it clear that it will take no equity from participating companies, and will claim no right to any intellectual property that they develop here (or have developed previously).

“We only ask only that we are invited to invest alongside other partners if fundraising is part of the eventual outcome of your participation in the program,” it said.

More here.